Atlanta’s Best Bars

That doesn’t mean that Buckhead doesn’t have its fair share of sports bars where beer rules and the ratio of television sets to customers is key. Here are several of our favorite sports bars in Buckhead. Get there on the Atlanta┬áMARTA.

Buckhead Saloon is a laid-back, high-energy place where sports are always on the many hi-def screens.

Dantanna’s, located adjacent to Lenox Mall, is a sports bar for those who appreciate great food along with television sets.

Elbow Room Bar is an authentic dive and proud of it. The Elbow Room, located on Pharr Road, has lots of televisions, wings, nachos, beer and lots of customers who want to discuss the teams that are playing on the many television screens.

Fado Irish Pub & Restaurant is everything you ‘d want an Irish pub to be– hearty food, cold beer and lots of televisions so you can discuss whatever sports team is on the “tube.” Irish pubs are always the social center of their communities, and Fado is exactly that in Buckhead. Of course, Fado is a fantastic place to watch American football, but stop by when soccer is playing and it’s a whole different experience.

Meehan’s Public House is an authentic Irish eatery that offers classic Irish dishes mixed in with a lot of good old American sports.

At Smokebelly BBQ, the customers cheer on their home team and argue over the merits of the opposing team, but there’s no dispute about the quality of the BBQ. There are plenty of televisions.

Twin Peaks, located on Piedmont Road, features food made from scratch, ice cold beer and “all the sports you can handle.” And, it gets even better. The folks at Twin Peaks brew their own beer.

Woofs on Piedmont is a sports bar aimed at serving the gay community. Woofs invites customers to watch their favorite team on one of 31 television seats. In addition to great food, Woofs sponsors numerous gay sports teams and leagues.
Whether you’re looking for a game to watch or just a great spot to have a drink with friends, find our guide to Atlanta’s bar scene here.

That doesn’t mean that Buckhead doesn’t have its fair share of sports bars where beer rules and the ratio of television sets to customers is key. Here are several of our favorite sports bars in Buckhead.

Woofs on Piedmont is a sports bar aimed at serving the gay community. In addition to great food, Woofs sponsors numerous gay sports teams and leagues.


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Transportation in Atlanta

The MARTA rail line has a station at the west end of the Atlanta airport, near the Ground Transportation area. Make sure to note if your destination from the airport is on the Red Line or the Yellow Line and board the correct train.

To use MARTA, you purchase a Breeze card at one of many easy-to-use machines at the station entrance. Each ride is $2.50 and you are charged $1.00 initially to purchase the reusable card. MARTA also sells day passes, which allows unlimited rides for a flat fee.

To enter the train station, you tap your card at the turnstile. Be sure to keep your card handy, as you will need to tap it again to exit the train station. You also tap your card to ride the bus, you do not need to tap your card to exit the bus.

The history of Atlanta’s transportation system began in 1836, when the state of Georgia decided to build a railroad to the Midwest and chose Atlanta to be the Terminus. Between 1845 and 1854 rail lines arrived from four different directions and Atlanta became a transportation hub of the Southeast. The introduction of Trackless trolleys in 1937 led to the gradual decline and eventual end of electric street car service.

By the end of 1949 Atlanta had a fleet of 453 trolleybuses, the largest in the United States, and it retained this distinction until 1952, when it was surpassed by Chicago. Clement Evans, Granger Hansell and Inman Brandon with Leland Anderson formed the Atlanta Transit Company and purchased the transportation properties on June 23, 1950.

In late 1962 Atlanta Transit decided to phase out all trolleybus service the next year, to avoid the expense of having to string new overhead wires when extending service to new areas. Since 1959, when Marmon-Herrington ceased production of trolleybuses, no manufacturer in North America was still making the electric vehicles (a situation which lasted until the late 1960s). Atlanta’s last trolleybus service operated on the night of September 27, 1963.

Originally constructed as a four to six lane expressway in the 1950s, the stretch of I-85 between the southern merge with I-75 and North Druid Hills Road was reconstructed as part of the Georgia Department of Transportation’s Freeing the Freeways program. This project included rebuilding all overpasses, new HOV-ready ramps (with the system implemented in 1996), and a widening of freeway capacity.

The portion of the highway from the Buford Highway Connector to GA 400 was constructed during the early 1980s, and was designed as a replacement for the original four-lane routing of I-85 (now GA 13). In addition, the new viaduct was designed to accommodate connections to the Georgia 400 tollway (then in planning), HOV lanes, and a bridge carrying the MARTA North Line (then under construction).

I-285 was opened in 1969 at a cost of $90 million as a four-lane highway throughout (two lanes each way).

Until 2000, the state of Georgia used the sequential interchange numbering system on all of its Interstate Highways. The first exit on each highway would begin with the number “1” and increase numerically with each exit. In 2000, the Georgia Department of Transportation switched to a mileage-based exit system, in which the exit number corresponded to the nearest milepost.

The MARTA rail line has a station at the west end of the Atlanta airport, near the Ground Transportation area. You can also go directly to Midtown (apx 25 mins), Buckhead (apx 35 mins), the Perimeter Mall area (apx 40 mins), Doraville or North Springs. Make sure to note if your destination from the airport is on the Red Line or the Yellow Line and board the correct train.

The history of Atlanta’s transportation system began in 1836, when the state of Georgia decided to build a railroad to the Midwest and chose Atlanta to be the Terminus. Between 1845 and 1854 rail lines arrived from four different directions and Atlanta became a transportation hub of the Southeast.

http://www.itsmarta.com

http://www.atlanta.net/explore/transportation/getting-around/


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Atlanta History

The history of Atlanta and its neighborhoods dates back to 1836, when Georgia decided to build a railroad to the U.S. Midwest and a location was chosen to be the line’s terminus. During the American Civil War, Atlanta, as a distribution hub, became the target of a major Union campaign, and in 1864 Union William Sherman’s troops set on fire and destroyed the city’s buildings and assets, save churches and hospitals. After the war the population grew rapidly, as did manufacturing, while the city retained its role as a rail hub.

The city’s elite black colleges were founded between 1865 and 1885, and despite disenfranchisement and the later imposition of Jim Crow laws in the 1910s, a prosperous black middle class and upper class emerged. By the early 20th century, “Sweet” Auburn Avenue was called “the most prosperous Negro street in the nation”. In the 1950s blacks started moving into city neighborhoods that had previously kept them out, while Atlanta’s first freeways enabled large numbers of whites to move to, and commute from, new suburbs. Atlanta was home to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and a major center for the Civil Rights Movement. Resulting desegregation occurred in stages over the 1960s. Slums were razed and the new Atlanta Housing Authority built public housing projects.

 

Atlanta Historic Center
Atlanta Historic Center

Just north of it, gleaming office towers and hotels rose, and in 1976 the new Georgia World Congress Center signaled Atlanta’s rise as a major convention city. While the suburbs grew rapidly, much of the city itself deteriorated and the city lost 21% of its population between 1970 and 1990.

In 1996 Atlanta hosted the Summer Olympics, for which new facilities and infrastructure were built. Hometown airline Delta continued to grow, and by 1998-9, Atlanta’s airport was the busiest in the world. Since the mid-90s, gentrification has given new life to many of the city’s intown neighborhoods. The 2010 census showed blacks leaving the city, whites moving to the city, and a much more diverse metro area with heaviest growth in the exurbs at its outer edges.

The region where Atlanta and its suburbs were built was originally Creek and Cherokee Native American territory. In 1813, the Creeks, who had been recruited by the British to assist them in the War of 1812, attacked and burned Fort Mims in southwestern Alabama. The conflict broadened and became known as the Creek War. In response, the United States built a string of forts along the Ocmulgee and Chattahoochee Rivers, including Fort Daniel on top of Hog Mountain near present-day Dacula, Georgia, and Fort Gilmer. Fort Gilmer was situated next to an important Indian site called Standing Peachtree, named after a large tree which is believed to have been a pine tree (the name referred to the pitch or sap that flowed from it). The word “pitch” was misunderstood for “peach,” thus the site’s name. The site traditionally marked a Native American meeting place at the boundary between Creek and Cherokee lands, at the point where Peachtree Creek flows into the Chattahoochee. The fort was soon renamed Fort Peachtree. A road was built linking Fort Peachtree and Fort Daniel following the route of existing trails.

As part of the systematic removal of Native Americans from northern Georgia from 1802 to 1825, [3] the Creek ceded the area that is now Metro Atlanta in 1821. Four months later, the Georgia Land Lottery Act created five new counties in the area that would later become Atlanta. [4] Dekalb County was created in 1822, from portions of Henry, Fayette, and Gwinnett Counties, and Decatur was created as its county seat the following year. [5] As part of the land lottery, Archibald Holland received a grant of 202.5 acres where downtown Atlanta would later be built. [6] [7] Holland farmed the land and operated a blacksmith shop. The land was wet and low-lying, so his cows often became mired in the mud. He left the area in 1833 to farm in Paulding County.

In 1830 an inn was established which would be known as Whitehall due to the then-unusual fact that it had a coat of white paint when most other buildings were of washed or natural wood. Later, Whitehall Street would be built as the road from Atlanta to Whitehall. The Whitehall area would be renamed West End in 1867 and is the oldest intact Victorian neighborhood of Atlanta.

In 1835, some leaders of the Cherokee Nation ceded their territory to the United States without the consent of the majority of the Cherokee people in exchange for land out west under the Treaty of New Echota, an act that led to the Trail of Tears.

During the American Civil War, Atlanta, as a distribution hub, became the target of a major Union campaign, and in 1864 Union William Sherman’s troops set on fire and destroyed the city’s assets and buildings, save churches and hospitals. In the 1950s blacks started moving into city neighborhoods that had previously kept them out, while Atlanta’s first freeways enabled large numbers of whites to move to, and commute from, new suburbs. Just north of it, gleaming office towers and hotels rose, and in 1976 the new Georgia World Congress Center signaled Atlanta’s rise as a major convention city. While the suburbs grew rapidly, much of the city itself deteriorated and the city lost 21% of its population between 1970 and 1990.
The 2010 census showed blacks leaving the city, whites moving to the city, and a much more diverse metro area with heaviest growth in the exurbs at its outer edges.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Atlanta


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Atlanta Neighborhoods

Atlanta’s neighborhoods are vital and unique, and each offers its personality to the city as a whole.

Midtown is always on the move, home to renowned arts organizations like the Woodruff Arts Center and outdoor treasures like Piedmont Park. Buckhead offers the most upscale shopping in the Southeast, where you can mingle with the Who’s Who of Atlanta.

The big city of Atlanta promises to welcome you like a small town. Discover something unexpected.

Downtown Atlanta

Most visitors’ journeys begin downtown in Centennial Olympic Park, the epicenter of downtown life. From its inspiring attractions such as Georgia Aquarium, World of Coca-Cola, CNN Center and Center for Civil and Human Rights to year-round sporting events at the Georgia Dome and Philips Arena, there’s always something going on in Downtown Atlanta.

The Convention & Entertainment District is where big events and family fun meet. Neighboring Fairlie-Poplar puts world-renowned performances center stage. And Castleberry Hill provides the perfect blend of eclectic artistry and city spirit.

Midtown Atlanta

Located less than a mile north of Centennial Olympic Park, Midtown Atlanta is bustling with art and energy. Known as Atlanta’s “Heart of the Arts,” Midtown is home to the Fox Theatre, High Museum of Art and the inventive world of the Center for Puppetry Arts.

From the constant energy of Piedmont Park where you can cycle, walk or simply relax to Peachtree Street, a walkable stretch of the city along the Midtown Mile, where people enjoy the art of living, Midtown Atlanta is always on the move. And when the sun goes down, Midtown turns up the volume with lounges and nightclubs. From Opera Nightclub to Sutra Lounge, dancing doesn’t stop until the sun comes up.

Buckhead


Known as the “Beverly Hills of the East,” Buckhead’s elegant residential streets are tree-lined and full of some of the most remarkable architecture and landscapes in all the south, including its most prized home the Swan House, located at the Atlanta History Center.

Visitors will find the trendiest of fashions and a variety of popular brands at Lenox Square, Phipps Plaza and The Shops Buckhead Atlanta. Buckhead dining ranges from casual eats to gourmet fare from Atlanta’s culinary icons and best new chefs. And as the sun sets, Buckhead’s hotel bars and rooftop lounges mix the right ingredients for a memorable night out on the town.

Westside Atlanta

Atlanta’s Westside starts less than a mile from Centennial Olympic Park. It’s where the design district meets shopping and dining in chic, industrial spaces.

Atlanta’s Westside has two distinct neighborhoods– West Midtown and Atlantic Station– and they each have their own personality. Visitors to Atlantic Station are treated to a walkable retail district full of shopping, restaurants and entertainment.West Midtown is the destination for design, art galleries, fashion and where some of Atlanta’s top restaurants are located.

Eastside Atlanta

Atlanta’s Westside starts less than a mile from Centennial Olympic Park. It’s where the design district meets shopping and dining in chic, industrial spaces.

Atlanta’s Westside has two distinct neighborhoods– West Midtown and Atlantic Station– and they each have their own personality. Visitors to Atlantic Station are treated to a walkable retail district full of shopping, restaurants and entertainment.West Midtown is the destination for design, art galleries, fashion and where some of Atlanta’s top restaurants are located.

Midtown is always on the move, home to renowned arts organizations like the Woodruff Arts Center and outdoor treasures like Piedmont Park. Buckhead offers the most upscale shopping in the Southeast, where you can mingle with the Who’s Who of Atlanta. From the constant energy of Piedmont Park where you can cycle, walk or simply relax to Peachtree Street, a walkable stretch of the city along the Midtown Mile, where people enjoy the art of living, Midtown Atlanta is always on the move. Visitors will find the trendiest of fashions and a variety of popular brands at Lenox Square, Phipps Plaza and The Shops Buckhead Atlanta. Buckhead dining ranges from casual eats to gourmet fare from Atlanta’s culinary icons and best new chefs.


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Atlanta Overview

Atlanta is one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation and an increasingly popular destination for college-educated young adults. In addition, a growing number of empty-nesters are moving closer to the city’s core to be near arts, shopping, culture, and dining. With a population of approximately 444,000, the city makes up about 10 percent of the 10-county region’s population.

Atlanta is the capital of the U.S. state of Georgia. Atlanta History Center chronicles the city’s past, and the Martin Luther King Jr.

Atlanta is the capital of and the most populous city in the U.S. state of Georgia, with an estimated 2016 population of 472,522. Atlanta is the economic and cultural center of the Atlanta metropolitan area, home to 5,710,795 people and the ninth largest metropolitan area in the United States. Atlanta is the county seat of Fulton County, and a small portion of the city extends eastward into DeKalb County.

In 1837, Atlanta was founded at the intersection of two railroad lines, and the city rose from the ashes of the American Civil War to become a national center of commerce. In the decades following the Civil Rights Movement, the city earned a reputation as “too busy to hate” for the relatively progressive views of its leaders and citizens compared to other cities in the Deep South. Atlanta attained international prominence, and it became the primary transportation hub of the Southeastern United States, via air, railroad, and highway, with Hartsfield– Jackson Atlanta International Airport being the world’s busiest airport since 1998.

Atlanta rated an “alpha -” world city that exerts a significant impact upon commerce, finance, research, technology, education, media, art, and entertainment. It ranks 40th among world cities and 8th in the nation with a gross domestic product of $270 billion. Atlanta’s economy is considered diverse, with dominant sectors that include logistics, professional and business services, media operations, and information technology. Atlanta has topographic features that include rolling hills and dense tree coverage. Revitalization of Atlanta’s neighborhoods, initially spurred by the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, has intensified in the 21st century, altering the city’s demographics, politics, and culture.

Atlanta has been dubbed everything from the “capital of the new South” and “the next international city” to “the best place to do business”. Fuelled by the prosperity of local mega-companies like Coca Cola and Holiday Inn, the prestige of hosting the 1996 Summer Olympic Games and the energy of young upwardly mobile types who have migrated to the city in droves– Atlanta is on fire, and this time it’s a good thing. Visit the Atlanta History Center or the Martin Luther King Jr.
Atlanta is one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation and an increasingly popular destination for college-educated young adults and a great place to live or buy a home. Atlanta is the capital of and the most populous city in the U.S. state of Georgia, with an estimated 2016 population of 472,522. Atlanta is the economic and cultural center of the Atlanta metropolitan area, home to 5,710,795 people and the ninth largest metropolitan area in the United States. Atlanta attained international prominence, and it became the primary transportation hub of the Southeastern United States, via railroad, highway, and air, with Hartsfield– Jackson Atlanta International Airport being the world’s busiest airport since 1998.

Revitalization of Atlanta’s neighborhoods, initially spurred by the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, has intensified in the 21st century, altering the city’s demographics, politics, and culture.


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Neighborhoods

Transport in Atlanta

History

Best Bars