Transportation in Atlanta

The MARTA rail line has a station at the west end of the Atlanta airport, near the Ground Transportation area. Make sure to note if your destination from the airport is on the Red Line or the Yellow Line and board the correct train.

To use MARTA, you purchase a Breeze card at one of many easy-to-use machines at the station entrance. Each ride is $2.50 and you are charged $1.00 initially to purchase the reusable card. MARTA also sells day passes, which allows unlimited rides for a flat fee.

To enter the train station, you tap your card at the turnstile. Be sure to keep your card handy, as you will need to tap it again to exit the train station. You also tap your card to ride the bus, you do not need to tap your card to exit the bus.

The history of Atlanta’s transportation system began in 1836, when the state of Georgia decided to build a railroad to the Midwest and chose Atlanta to be the Terminus. Between 1845 and 1854 rail lines arrived from four different directions and Atlanta became a transportation hub of the Southeast. The introduction of Trackless trolleys in 1937 led to the gradual decline and eventual end of electric street car service.

By the end of 1949 Atlanta had a fleet of 453 trolleybuses, the largest in the United States, and it retained this distinction until 1952, when it was surpassed by Chicago. Clement Evans, Granger Hansell and Inman Brandon with Leland Anderson formed the Atlanta Transit Company and purchased the transportation properties on June 23, 1950.

In late 1962 Atlanta Transit decided to phase out all trolleybus service the next year, to avoid the expense of having to string new overhead wires when extending service to new areas. Since 1959, when Marmon-Herrington ceased production of trolleybuses, no manufacturer in North America was still making the electric vehicles (a situation which lasted until the late 1960s). Atlanta’s last trolleybus service operated on the night of September 27, 1963.

Originally constructed as a four to six lane expressway in the 1950s, the stretch of I-85 between the southern merge with I-75 and North Druid Hills Road was reconstructed as part of the Georgia Department of Transportation’s Freeing the Freeways program. This project included rebuilding all overpasses, new HOV-ready ramps (with the system implemented in 1996), and a widening of freeway capacity.

The portion of the highway from the Buford Highway Connector to GA 400 was constructed during the early 1980s, and was designed as a replacement for the original four-lane routing of I-85 (now GA 13). In addition, the new viaduct was designed to accommodate connections to the Georgia 400 tollway (then in planning), HOV lanes, and a bridge carrying the MARTA North Line (then under construction).

I-285 was opened in 1969 at a cost of $90 million as a four-lane highway throughout (two lanes each way).

Until 2000, the state of Georgia used the sequential interchange numbering system on all of its Interstate Highways. The first exit on each highway would begin with the number “1” and increase numerically with each exit. In 2000, the Georgia Department of Transportation switched to a mileage-based exit system, in which the exit number corresponded to the nearest milepost.

The MARTA rail line has a station at the west end of the Atlanta airport, near the Ground Transportation area. You can also go directly to Midtown (apx 25 mins), Buckhead (apx 35 mins), the Perimeter Mall area (apx 40 mins), Doraville or North Springs. Make sure to note if your destination from the airport is on the Red Line or the Yellow Line and board the correct train.

The history of Atlanta’s transportation system began in 1836, when the state of Georgia decided to build a railroad to the Midwest and chose Atlanta to be the Terminus. Between 1845 and 1854 rail lines arrived from four different directions and Atlanta became a transportation hub of the Southeast.

http://www.itsmarta.com

http://www.atlanta.net/explore/transportation/getting-around/


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